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Grilling Pork and Beef

May 15, 2013

It’s often been said that you can eat every part of a pig but the squeal. Previously I’ve shared some ways to barbecue pork and beef, but you don’t have to fix it barbecue style to cook either on the grill. If you do it right, grilling allows fat to melt away and a delectable smoke flavor to remain. Pork is easy to grill—so (sorry…) try not to make a pig out of yourself.

How to grill pork chops

Pork Chop at CHEFScatalog.comAccording to eHow.com, first prepare your marinade of choice and place pork chops in it to soak overnight in the refrigerator—be sure to fully immerse the meat and rotate it occasionally. If you prefer a rub, it should be applied to the sides as well as the top and bottom of the meat.

When ready to grill, leave time for your grill (charcoal or gas) to heat up before cooking (about 30 minutes). You want the grill hot before cooking the pork chops. Ten minutes after starting your grill, remove the chops from the refrigerator and let them sit at room temperature for 20 minutes to allow the chop to warm slightly to avoid hot grill shock.

Place the pork chops on your grilling surface, close the grill, and cook each side for three minutes on high. Then reduce the heat by either adjusting the propane or raising the grill rack. Use a meat thermometer to monitor the temperature. Cook until internal temperature reaches 145 degrees F. When inserting the thermometer, make sure it is in the middle of the cut (use a grill glove as the probe can get hot).

How to grill pork ribs

Grill ribs low and slow over an indirect heat—so, keep your coals on one side of the grill and place the ribs on the grate away from the hot coals. Add more coals/wood chips as needed and cook until the meat is tender. If you’ve pre-cooked the ribs in the oven, you just need to reheat and/or smoke on the grill for flavor.

To smoke pre-cooked ribs, prepare your grill for indirect heat, with the coals on one side of the grill. Soak a large handful of woodchips (apple wood, hickory, or other fruit wood) in water for at least 30 minutes. When the coals are ready, place the ribs on the grate away from the heat and toss the woodchips (drained) onto the hot coals. Cover the grill with the lid and smoke for about 20 minutes. Brush the ribs with sauce, if desired, and continue smoking for another five minutes.

Cut of meat

Method

Heat

Time

Internal Temp. (minimum)

Pork Chop

 

 

 

 

¾-inch thick

Direct

Medium-High

2 to 3 mins/side

145 degrees F (63 C)

1-½-inch thick

Direct

Medium

10-15 mins, turning frequently

145 degrees F (63 C)

Tenderloin

 

 

 

 

1 pound

Direct

Medium

15-20 mins, turning frequently

145 degrees F (63 C)

Kebobs

 

 

 

 

1-½-inch cubes

Direct

Medium-High

8-12 mins, turning frequently

145 degrees F (63 C)

Ribs

 

 

 

 

2-4 pounds

Indirect

Medium

45 mins to 1-½ hours

Will be well above 200 degrees F (93 C)

 

 

 

 

From allrecipes.com

 

Recipes for pork on the grill: Smoked ribs; Cook's Country Grilled Pork Tenderloin and Garlicky Potato Salad

For many, beef is the staple of backyard grilling. When you want that seared taste it’s easy to grab a pound of hamburger, throw some patties together, and fire up the grill. But you can optimize even your hamburger experience by doing some simple prep work and trying some new recipes. So, c’mon, get fired up for burgers, steaks, and kabobs!

How to grill hamburgers

Meat Grinder at CHEFScatalog.comMake 'em juicy, suggests allrecipes.com! These simple steps will help you prepare the juiciest grilled burgers on the block—and make you a backyard grilling pro.

  • Don’t lean into it: Choose ground beef that is no leaner than 85 percent. Extra-lean beef is healthier, but the burgers tend to be dry and less flavorful. Use the leaner stuff in other recipes, but not for the grill.
  • Grinding: Coarsely grind your own meat—or ask your butcher to freshly grind beef just for you. A course grind is juicier than a fine grind.
  • Juice it up: For even juicier burgers, mix in a few tablespoons of tomato juice or beef broth for every pound of meat.
  • Handle meat gently: No need to manhandle your burgers into dense, perfectly uniform discs. Instead, press lightly until the meat sticks together. The results will be juicier, more flavorful burgers.
  • Leave them alone: Resist the urge to press burgers with a spatula or turn them frequently.

 

How to grill steaks

You don’t need to spend your whole weekly paycheck for a tender, tasty piece of beef. I mean, you can of course—tenderloins, porterhouses, and T-bones are worth the price now and then. But some less expensive cuts are nearly as good. Consider the chuck top blade, New York, club, rib-eye and rib, top sirloin, and round tip for a softer hit on your wallet. Try these tips:

  • Heat it up: Place steaks over the hottest part of the fire.
  • Hands off: Leave them there for at least three minutes—don’t move from here to there.
  • Be even-handed: When the first side is browned, flip them to sear the other side.
  • Improvise: If your perfectly seared steak is a bit too rare for you, move it to an indirect heat part of the grill to finish cooking.

CHEFS Grill Baskets at CHEFScatalog.comHow to grill kebabs

I don’t know about you, but there is just something about grilling marinated, seasoned bite-sized cubes of meat (with vegetables and fruit) over a hot fire. Skewers can be fun, but I prefer grill baskets—no more pieces falling through the grate! Some ideas:

  • Choose wisely, grasshopper: Select moderately tender beef for kebabs like top sirloin.
  • Yo-yo, use yogurt: Make tougher cuts of meat tender with a yogurt-based marinade.
  • Separate or not? Because meat and vegetables have different cooking times, some prefer to stick with one kind of food in each basket. But I like to co-mingle them for enhanced flavor—consider starting the beef first and then adding veggies and fruits to your baskets (be sure to leave room!)

Cut of meat

Method

Heat

Time

Internal Temp. (minimum)

Steaks

 

 

 

 

¾-inch thick

Direct

High

3 to 5 mins/side

145 degrees F (63 C)

1-½-inch thick

Direct

High

7 to 8 mins/side

145 degrees F (63 C)

2-inch thick

Direct

High

10 to 12 mins/side

145 degrees F (63 C)

Hamburgers

 

 

 

 

½-inch thick

Direct

High

3 mins/side

160 degrees F (70 C)

Kebobs

 

 

 

 

1-inch cubes

Direct

High

3 to 4 mins turning frequently

145 degrees F (63 C)

Back ribs

 

 

 

 

Single ribs

Direct

High

10 mins/side

160 degrees F (70 C)

Rib rack

Indirect

Medium

3 hours

160 degrees F (70 C)

 

 

 

 

From allrecipes.com

 

Recipes for beef on the grill: Cowboy Burgers; Simple Grilled Steaks; Grilled Rib Steak with Cipolline Red Pepper and Balsamic Vinegar Glace

What's hot?

According to Sharon Tyler Herbst in her excellent resource The Food Lover’s Companion, there’s a simple way to determine what “hot” is. Herbst wrote, “The number of seconds you can comfortably hold your hand (over the grill) will give you a rule of thumb for how hot the fire is.”

  2 seconds: Hot (for searing)
  3 seconds: Medium-hot (for grilling)
  4 seconds: Medium (for grilling)
  5 seconds: Medium-low (for covered cooking)

 

Want to know more about grilling? Check out our other blogs on the subject here at CHEFS Mix:

Your turn: When do you prefer to grill? Are you an "all-year-rounder" or one who saves it for the time between Memorial Day and Labor Day?

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Tags: Pork, Beef, Grilling, Grilling Tools